Christchurch – and saying goodbye to so much…

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/03/christchurch-and-saying-goodbye-to-so-much/

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Christchurch – and saying goodbye to so much                                                       

Our saddest times are when those we love leave us. What when there is not even time to say goodbye, with the pain and confusion even worse?  Everywhere the hearts and minds of New Zealanders, irrespective of their personal faiths, reached out to the victims of the appalling massacre in Christchurch of Muslims, family people attending a mosque, murdered in an act so evil few would have credited it happening in this country.

There are undoubtedly lessons to be learned from this. What we should worry about is that some of these may very well be the wrong ones, and may be used to advantage those whom no country ever lacks – those few, very determined, radicalised individuals anxious to undermine it – with the help of history’s “useful fools” who, as always, fall into their hands.  Among those most likely to produce overreaching, knee-jerk regulation in response will be our politicians.

Ironically, what the media are of course actually avoiding mentioning is how very rare in the West is such an assault against on a Muslim community  – contrasted with the sustained attack upon Western democracies long mounted by Islamic fanaticism. The latter is of course rejected by moderate Muslims, very often even its first target, but,  like all so called “ordinary people” worldwide, basically as conservative and motivated by love for their families and friends as those from all  other countries.

Ordinary people? I recall once stopping at a Muslim coffee shop near Wellington. I’ll never forget the sheer kindness of its owner, Abdel,  who insisted, without payment, on giving my sister and me a special cup of coffee and an almond biscuit when he found we had just left from farewelling my mother.

I recall, too, years ago, the young Chinese university student from a sheltered building in almost torrential rain at Canterbury University. With the tarmac virtually a flooded lake, she saw me trying to juggle an umbrella and saturated map, and came to help me locate the building I needed – ending up equally saturated.

And strikingly, Cliff Emeny, the New Zealand fighter pilot to whom I dedicated my book “The 100 days – Claiming back New Zealand – what has gone wrong and how we can control our politicians,” who contacted me when a Dominion columnist, raising questions about what was happening to our democracy. It was Cliff who sent me to check out the only genuine democracy in the world, Switzerland,   whose people control their politicians  – not vice versa. Shot down in Burma in World War II,  tortured by brutal Japanese military to reveal the whereabouts of his squadron, Cliff was tied each day to a stake in the burning sun. However, Japanese night guards crept out to untie him, lying him down to sleep,  giving him food,  drink and sleep – retying him in the morning before the day shift took over.

What happened in Christchurch is an appalling, shocking reminder of the reality of evil. Throughout Western countries, there has been rising concern that Islamic fanaticism, turning also upon its own people, was reaching even further  achieving damaging mileage through the emotional pressures of the refugee movement. The consequences for societies such as Angela Merkel’s in Germany, where Isis members have openly boasted of successful infiltration –  while posing as genuine refugees  –  have included  the marked rise of terrorism, including  leaps in both violent crimes and attacks on Western women.

New Zealanders have only gradually become aware of the very real threat posed by transnational terrorism, which the Australian government identified in 2004 as a threat to Australia and to Australian citizens.   From 2000 onwards tensions rose between Muslim immigrants and a wider Australian community,  particularly given the reporting of gangs of Lebanese men sexually assaulting Australian women.

Reflecting on the humanity of people worldwide used as political tools and cannon fodder by ambitious leaders, one can see the commonality between those who are now saying they have had enough, New Zealanders among these – but rather late in the day. Being somewhat over–sheltered, with no historically aggressive foreign countries pressing on our borders  has led to that our present, incredibly naïve Prime Minister even dismissing the possibility of  Russian spies in our country. And now, with Communist Chinese funding being questioned in relation to political donations,  that our equally  challenged National Opposition contains a former Communist Chinese spymaster, hiding his credentials at the time to gain List entry into Parliament,  beggars belief.

Change has been so incremental that it is very late for non-politicised individuals to realise how much has regressed since we were regarded as  “God’s own country” and “the best place in the world to bring up children”. Contrast this with the Left’s now domination of the teacher unions; the dumbing down,  quite shocking propagandising of the schools curricula replacing valuable, worthwhile content;  and the abuse of children by its progressively worse “liberalising” –  to the extent where it is now proposed that destructive transgender indoctrination be forced on schoolchildren – irrespective of the objection of parents.  The American College of Pediatricians’ warning that  – “Conditioning children into believing that a lifetime of chemical and surgical impersonation of the opposite sex is normal and healthful is child abuse”  –  cuts no ice with our neo-Marxists infiltrators long gaining control of the directions of education  –  and of mainstream media in this country.

The result? The pernicious attack on free speech, the essential component of a genuine democracy by those bludgeoning New Zealanders with the name-calling of hate speech, racism, homophobia – any verbal bullying tool to hand. And foremost among New Zealanders’ concerns has been the fact that the unctuous calling for “diversity”  by the virtue-signalling evades the fact that diversity, divisiveness and division are wedges used to destroy the essential cohesiveness of a stable society.

A huge challenge lies ahead, to prevent the excuse of the dreadful happening in Christchurch being used as a tool to further target those raising genuine concerns  about so much decision-making from which recent governments have very much  excluded New Zealanders.

 

© Amy Brooke

 

Christchurch –  and saying goodbye to so much

 

 

The bully boys and girls have gone too far

https://www.spectator.com.au/2018/07/the-bully-boys-and-girls-have-gone-too-far/

We all know that among human beings, in every ethnic grouping, individuals vary enormously. And I’ll always recall with gratitude the kindness of a Wellington Muslim café owner, Abdel, who, learning that we had just come from farewelling my mother, brought my sister and me a cup of coffee with an almond biscuit – and would take no payment.

Any well-justified concern at the aggressive worldwide march of Islam needs to take into account that most people share basic aims, wanting peace for their families and the best for their children. We have this in common with New Zealanders of all backgrounds – including family-minded Muslims who now regard themselves as New Zealanders and have happily become part of our communities.

However, the threat to this country from radicalised Islam targeting, propagandising, recruiting, even virtually blackmailing its own people is very real. So New Zealanders have a right to know what steps the government is taking to safeguard this country – and to limit the intake from those from Islamic background.

We should now be well aware, given what is happening right throughout Europe, and even in our closest neighbour, Australia, that when the numbers are sufficiently large, assimilation is replaced by virtual enclaves, or ghettoised settlements. Women and young girls continue to be sexually mutilated and basically enslaved by their male relatives, forced or brainwashed to wearing anachronistic, burdensome clothing,  while Islam’s deep antagonism to Christianity and the West should make us very wary of our government’s apparent naivety – if not incompetence  – in the face of its strident minority demands.

We all now well know the pattern happening world-wide. Radicalised activists from other cultures, sheltering within ethnic groups, begin to challenge majority rule – and to demand the damaging separatism which has occurred under the manipulative, ideological demands for multiculturalism.

So-called diversity, the superior merits of which we are constantly assailed with, is simply a weasel word wielded like a bludgeon to propagandise and intimidate New Zealanders beginning to ask well-overdue questions about what is happening to this country.

It is time for our politicians put their hands up to answer them. Our political parties’ responsibility is given to them by New Zealanders – to represent us, in accordance with our wishes – not to constantly over-ride them. But it is the latter which has now become entrenched.

Join our 100 Days – Claiming Back New Zealand movement – www.100days.co.nz

 © Amy Brooke

Does Susan Devoy favour censorship by prosecution?

Does Susan Devoy favour censorship by prosecution? Apparently so – with her suggestion of involving the police to charge those she fancies have committed “hate speech”.

While in every society  there are undoubtedly individuals whose form of expression is extreme, unfair, or thoroughly objectionable, there is very good reason why we have not in the past moved towards a more totalitarian society –  by removing the right to free speech.

What our Race Relations Conciliator does not seem able to take on board is the fact that  New Zealand can no longer claim to be a free society if she achieves her apparent wish – to have individuals charged with the crime of using speech she and others may find offensive.

This is a horrifically dangerous move for any government to embark upon – a new form of censorship which would have been completely unthinkable to our parents and grandparents. Only in times of war,  when loose tongues could cost lives, has any Western society risked the damage done to one of the most important of human freedoms – people’s very basic rights to speak the truth as they see it.

But there is no doubt now that individuals are under threat today, even vilified, or virulently attacked for speaking the truth as they see this – for pointing out the growing dangers threatening our society.  The form of Muslim extremism, for example, sweeping across Europe, tolerates no opposition, the least form of which is name-calling and disparaging its opponents – those with the courage still to try to warn about what is actually happening to this now troubled continent.

 It has always been recognised that whether individual opinions are considered right or wrong – an open society is the only one compatible with Western freedoms – and the underpinning of democracy. Open debate and free comment are the best remedies to counter extremism. And we should be questioning why, if Devoy has any real knowledge of what happened to those societies in the 20th century (and today) in which the climate of intimidation allowed dictatorships to flourish, she has not taken the lessons on board.

It’s happening again. From one of the best informed website journals, The Gatestone Institute, comes this reminder of what happens when the State begins to censor speech. It contains a reminder by Spiked Online editor, Brendan O’Neill, that “politically correct speech does not need protecting. The United States first Amendment exists precisely to protect the minority from the majority – and to protect unpopular opinions from those who would silence them.”  https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/12008/france-le-pen-free-speech#.WrNlggLKBas.gmail

There seems little doubt that Susan Devoy, with her aim of having suppressed speech or opinions which she finds unpalatable, thinks these should be silenced.

 This is not only an aim incompatible with democratic freedoms – (regardless of the creeping activism we have seen for some time, in relation to even our court decisions). It flies in the face of that most important reminder from The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights.

Article 19.

“Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.”

We have already in this country seen the rise of bullying and name-calling whereby radical activism uses the tactics of badmouthing thoughtful critics by targeting them as racist, or homophobic, for example. As it works by silencing all too many worried about the repercussions ensuing from standing up for their beliefs, we have started on the first step of a very slippery slope.

Ms Devoy arguably needs to think much more deeply of the consequences of her wish to involve the police to target individuals whose utterances she disapproves of. This will undoubtedly take us even further down the road of a virtual Police State that some maintain, with reason, we are already embarked upon.

©  Amy Brooke, Convener. See my book “100 Days – Claiming Back New Zealand …what has gone wrong, and how we can control our politicians.” Available through www.amybrooke.co.nz, Kindle, or HATM Publishers.